Going back to the handmade — ‘Maker’s market’ at Capital One bank

SCOTT FEIERSTEIN PHOTO Peggie Ehlers, the maker behind Nuna Knits, chatted with market-goers about Angora rabbits and what goes into the creation of a great sweater or hat.

SCOTT FEIERSTEIN PHOTO
Peggie Ehlers, the maker behind Nuna Knits, chatted with market-goers about Angora rabbits and what goes into the creation of a great sweater or hat.

On Saturday mornings, from 10:30 to noon outside the old Capital One bank at the corer of West Neck and Menantic roads, Eric Goodman organizes Market 21, a “true maker’s market” that aims to bring together the best artisans, craftspeople and food makers from around the East End.

Mr. Goodman runs a similar maker’s market in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. He is also the co-founder of Hoddy Toddy, an organic tea company with products available in more than 20 gourmet markets in New York City.

Though he spends most of his time in the city, he feels deeply connected to Shelter Island because his wife, Alexandra Fairweather, grew up here and her uncle, realtor Angelo Picozzi, is “the friendliest guy on Island,” Mr. Goodman said. “It’s a really tight-knit family. I thought, ‘Lets bring the local artists and craftspeople together like we do in other markets to a place I know and love, Shelter Island.”

And so he did.

Planning to be a part of the Island scene on Saturdays until Labor Day, the market has around 12 regular vendors, including Patty’s Berries and Bunches from Mattituck, Goodale Farms from Riverhead and the King Andrew Cheese wagon, also from the North Fork.

“We have a wonderful network of friends and locals that come every Saturday,” Mr. Goodman said.

While sampling cheese at the King Andrew Cheese Wagon, Taylor Simons of Shelter Island said, “We drove by this morning and thought we’d check it out. The sunflowers were so gorgeous. We’re going to get some cheese and grapes for our happy hour on the beach later. The location is perfect. It looks awesome.”

Reeve Andrew, a culinary arts teacher at the Ross School and one of the owners of King Andrew Cheese, sources high-quality cheeses from Long Island and around the world. While he does most of his business at wineries and private events, he loves farmers markets like Market 21 because they, “bring a lot of wonderful people together to bring delicious and well-made products to patrons.”

The vendors who participate in Market 21 are true artisans who know their craft, Mr. Goodman said. He enjoys the local, individually made products, as opposed to those that are mass produced.

Peggie Ehlers, the maker behind Nuna Knits, which specializes in locally sourced yarns and hand spinning, said she’s excited to see where this new market goes.

“Most of the American consumers today have no idea what they’re buying,” Ms. Ehlers said. “Eric is great because he wants to build a true maker’s market. He wants to know how it’s grown and how it’s sewn.”

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