Articles by

Barbaraellen Koch

02/03/13 1:00pm
BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO  |  Artist Frank Wimberley juried the show Friday night at East End Arts.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Artist Frank Wimberley juried the show Friday night at East End Arts.

“In which ways are you personally diverse?” was the question posed to artists for the all-media art show “Diversity,” which held an opening reception Friday evening in the East End Arts gallery building in downtown Riverhead.

Internationally renowned artist/painter Frank Wimberley of Queens and Sag Harbor juried the show, selecting 64 pieces of art from  150 entries.

Mr. Wimberley said he was “so pleased to make these selections.”

His wife, Juanita Wimberley, said the hanging of the art is as important as the selections.

“She gets the gold star for hanging the show,” she said, referring to gallery director Jane Kirkwood.

“Best in Show” was awarded to Katherine Liepe-Levinson of Riverhead for her photograph titled ‘Babel: My Life.’

Marion Jones of Southold was awarded second place for her collage ‘Trusting My Instincts.’ Calverton artist Nannette Tiano won third place for her photograph titled ‘Tulle #1.’

[SEE THE WINNERS BELOW]

The art show is in conjunction with a sister show exploring a similar theme held at the Suffolk County Historical Society titled “Hidden & Forbidden: Objects and Art of Intolerance.” The two exhibits will come together for a panel discussion at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 16 at the Suffolk County Historical Society to explore the topic of racism in “post-racist” America. The discussion is free and open to the public.

photo@timesreview.com

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO  |  Anna Jurnich of Wading River's acrylic painting  titled, "So, Who Am I , Lord?"

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Anna Jurnich of Wading River’s acrylic painting titled, “So, Who Am I , Lord?”

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO  |  Arts school faculty member Billy Johnson of Riverhead (from left) performed a piece inspired by the 'Blues' with students Brandon Boardman of Riverhead and Luke Jurow of Quogue.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Arts school faculty member Billy Johnson of Riverhead (from left) performed a piece inspired by the ‘Blues’ with students Brandon Boardman of Riverhead and Luke Jurow of Quogue.

Best in Show

Best in Show: ‘Babel: My Life’ by Katherine Liepe-Levinson.

First Place

First Place: ‘Paint’ by Ruth Nasca of East Hampton

Second Place

Second Place: ‘Trusting My Instincts’ by Marion Jones

Third Place

Third Place: ‘Tulle #1′ by Nannette Tiano.

 

09/18/12 7:19pm

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | A U.S. pararescue team competes in a rodeo on the Peconic Bay Tuesday.

The threat of high winds and rain didn’t stop the Air National Guard from hosting its rescue rodeo in the Peconic Bay Tuesday morning.

Six U.S. pararescue teams, known as PJs, and one all-volunteer Sea Rescue group from South Africa (Cape Town, Plattenberg and Port Elizabeth) showed off their skills in a race of five-person teams on inflatable Zodiac boats.

“[The race] requires a little bit of thoughtful navigation, breath holding and other skills we use in rescues and other missions,” said Master Sergeant Jules Roy, a PJ with the Air National Guard’s 106th Rescue Wing in Westhampton Beach. The 106th is hosting the rodeo, so its members are not participating. It is held every two years and the 106th won the event in Kentucky four years ago.

The race, which began at 8:30 a.m., went from Treasure Cove Marina in Riverhead to Greenport and back. It’s part of a week-long reunion of pararescue technicians.

They headed out on the Peconic River to the County 105 bridge propelled only by paddle, since it’s a no-wake zone. Once there, a designated PJ had to climb a 30-foot rope to the top of the bridge and record his time. After that, the teams headed to Greenport, powered by a 30-horsepower motor.

Once in Greenport, the teams competed in precision parachuting over Great Peconic Bay. The five-person Zodiac teams then had to dive without scuba gear into the harbor to retrieve a keg full of water, representing the illegal liquor that flowed into the village during Prohibition, and unlock a cable to free cans of fuel needed to return to Riverhead.

See the slideshow on riverheadnewsreview.com

06/24/12 12:00pm

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTO | Ashley Schmitt of Phil Schmitt and Sons Farm on Sound Avenue in Riverhead husks some corn for a customer at the farm stand on Sound Avenue Saturday afternoon.

In a typical year on the North Fork, corn season wouldn’t begin for another couple weeks. This is not your typical corn season.

Some farm stands have already begun selling local corn and it’s sweeter than early-season corn usually is.

Ashley Schmitt of Phil Schmitt and Sons Farm on Sound Avenue in Riverhead said Saturday was the first day her family was selling local corn. The corn came from neighboring Anderson Farm on Roanoke Avenue.

The Andersons also have their own farm stand on Route 58 in front of the Target parking lot.

The Schmitt’s corn should be ready to harvest by the Fourth of July, Ashley said.

04/14/12 7:00am

Shelter Island herbalist and educator Sarah Sheppard shared Native Americans stories with children as part of the spring break program, “Montaukett Princess Heather Flower” Thursday morning on the lawn of the Suffolk County Historical Society building in Riverhead.

The children created Native American medicine bags, crafted using rose petals, bay leaves, cinnamon, jasmine flowers, rosemary, cloves and a special stone.

The medicine Bags were traditionally carried by Native Americans on their journeys, put under pillows for luck and held closely to remember their relatives, she said.

BARBARAELLEN KOCH PHOTOS | Shelter Island native herbalist and educator Sarah Sheppard (second from left) on the lawn of the Suffolk County Historical Society, where she taught kids about Native American culture Thursday.

John Foley, 9, of Riverhead (from left), Bryn Stevenson, 9, of Riverhead, Amelia Stevenson, 8, of Riverhead and Jack Lacey, 9, of Mastic Beach grind up herbs and flowers for their medicine bags.

Bryn Stevenson, 9, of Riverhead uses a clam shell to fill the medicine bag.

A stone is placed in each bag.

Dried jasmine flowers.

Bridgette Murphy, 8, of Riverhead and April Gonzales, 7, of Riverhead grind the flowers and herbs in a mortar and pestle for their medicine bags.