Featured Story
08/20/14 8:00am
Proud pickle ball players Monday cut a ribbon on the Shelter Island courts after recieving the  blessing of town Recreation Director Garth Griffin. That’s Marji Cyr wielding the scissors and Jini Martens holding the ribbon on the right.

BERLEA WALZ PHOTO | Proud pickle ball players Monday cut a ribbon on the Shelter Island courts after recieving the blessing of town Recreation Director Garth Griffin. That’s Marji Cyr wielding the scissors and Jini Martens holding the ribbon on the right.

Pickle Ball has come to Shelter Island complete with a ribbon cutting on the Shelter Island tennis courts.

A group of 30 or so players have been matching up for a couple of months, but on Monday they gatherred to make it official.

Marji Cyr and Betsy Ludlow have been the guiding spirits bringing the sport here.

It’s a game for all ages and skill levels, played with a whiffle ball and short paddles. Similar to tennis, badminton and ping-pong, but truly in its own category, the name comes from the Pacific Northwest where, it’s said, the sport was invented.

Out there, “the pickle boat” is the last boat to return with its catch, and at the sport’s birth, someone  said that choosing up sides was like picking through the leftovers of the last boat.

Ms. Cyr says anyone is welcome to play, and the pickle ball matches are at the courts every Monday from 8:30 to 11 a.m. and after 5:30 p.m.

08/19/14 10:00am
COURTESY PHOTO | Two volunteers working  to restore memorial tabletops at the rear of the Presbyterian Church.

COURTESY PHOTO | Two volunteers working to restore memorial tabletops at the rear of the Presbyterian Church.

The Shelter Island Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution is midway through the preservation project of the Brinley and Mary Sylvester and Thomas and Mary Dering tabletops at the rear of the Presbyterian Church. (more…)

08/11/14 12:02pm
Patricia Yourdan, left and Pat Shillingburg transcribing one of the last letters in a batch of more than 700 written from the 1740s to the 1820s.

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO | Patricia Yourdan, left and Pat Shillingburg transcribing one of the last letters in a batch of more than 700 written from the 1740s to the 1820s.

A team of enthusiastic amateur historians, led by Patricia Shillingburg, spent much of the summer transcribing a treasure-trove of 762 letters written by and to Thomas Dering and his children between the 1740s and the 1820s. Here, Patricia Yourdan and Pat are transcribing one of the last letters. At a reception hosted by Pat and Ed Shillingburg on August 3, Pat presented Phyllis Wallace, archivist for the Shelter Island Historical Society, with a thumb drive containing the complete transcript of the letters, making them accessible to scholars and researchers.