07/28/18 3:00pm
RICHARD LOMUSCIO PHOTO Katie, a two-and-a-half year-old mini Labradoodle who’s been certified by the Alliance of Therapy Dogs.

RICHARD LOMUSCIO PHOTO
Katie, a two-and-a-half year-old mini Labradoodle who’s been certified by the Alliance of Therapy Dogs.

I had a delightful time at the Senior Center last Wednesday.

Director Laurie Fanelli asked me to come over to see the visiting therapy dog who was coming to the Silver Circle. I told Laurie that I had an appointment in Sag Harbor (I was on the track of a new computer) and I also had the grandkids in tow. I had also promised them lunch at Panera Bread.

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07/10/18 4:30pm
BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTOS Rascal the guinea pig and Boo the pug go nose-to-nose in the arms of their owners, Nicolle De Leonardis and Angelina Rice.

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTOS
Rascal the guinea pig and Boo the pug go nose-to-nose in the arms of their owners, Nicolle De Leonardis and Angelina Rice.

On the sunny morning of July 7, approximately 40 dogs — and one guinea pig — and their owners gathered in a shady park across the street from Our Lady of the Isle Church for the annual “Blessing of the Pets” ceremony.

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12/01/12 9:56am

GABBY GLANTZMAN PHOTO | The three-legged deer near an Orient home, with wood and wire tangled in its antlers.

It was a white-tailed deer, not a reindeer, but there was still holiday spirit aplenty when the North Fork Animal Welfare League got help from a local veterinarian in rescuing a three-legged buck whose antlers were hopelessly tangled in nylon ribbon, wooden posts and tomato cages at an Orient residence. The mess was attached to a nearby fence, trapping him.

“The poor guy, I figured if anyone deserves a second chance, he does,” said Dr. John Andresen, a veterinarian at Matittuck-Laurel Veterinary Hospital who helped to free the deer.

“He could still run around, but his head was tied to this long lead of tangled up fencing,” said NFAWL director Gillian Wood Pultz. She called Dr. Andresen, who has a keen interest in large animals, to come out with a tranquilizer gun so the rescue team to get close enough to remove the unwanted headgear without harming the animal or themselves.

“Once he was tranquilized it only took about 10 or 15 minutes to get him untangled,” Ms. Pultz said. Eventually the buck regained consciousness.

“That was a pretty traumatic experience and he needed to calm down, so we just let him be as he woke up and told the owners of the property to call us if he wasn’t up and moving around in an hour,” she said.

Dr. Andresen said he was only too happy to help save the deer.

“Initially, when I got out of vet school, I wanted to be a zoo vet,” he said. “But that’s not really practical because there aren’t many openings to do that, so it’s always just been an interest of mine.”

Ms. Wood Pultz described the rescue as “a good story because it had a good outcome. More often than not there are bad outcomes and we have to humanely euthanize the deer. Every year, we see deer that haven’t been tracked by hunters running around with arrows in them. Recently we had to humanely euthanize a fawn that was attacked by a dog and suffered a broken spine.”

Ms. Wood Pultz said traumatic injuries in deer are fairly common, but three-legged deer are less so and she knows of only one other, which has been living in Southold Town for years.

As for the Orient deer’s missing foreleg, she said the amputation appeared to be an old injury.

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