06/09/17 2:00pm
DAVID LAPHAM PHOTO | Sicilian pan pizza

DAVID LAPHAM PHOTO | Sicilian pan pizza

Of all the things I tell people I’ve cooked, nothing evokes more of a reaction than pizza. Not soufflés. Not the temperamental hollandaise. Not even a delicate consommé of shellfish. Nope. It’s pizza. It’s become apparent to me that the thought of making pizza from scratch terrifies most home cooks. So I thought it would be a good time to set the record straight. (more…)

04/28/17 10:00am
CHARITY ROBEY PHOTO | The author and chef's horseradish crackers.

CHARITY ROBEY PHOTO | The author and chef’s horseradish crackers.

April is a difficult month for locavores. At a time when green shoots are coming up everywhere, and fruit trees are blooming, there is nothing green to eat, nor fruit to pick. The only edible things coming out of the earth in this season must be dug up, and that’s why horseradish is my subject. Planted in the spring, it grows all summer, fall and winter until a year later, it’s a root that looks like a shillelagh and acts like smelling salts.

Think of horseradish as Long Island mustard. (more…)

04/18/17 2:00pm
041317_IslandBites_Steakandgingerdressing

DAVID LAPHAM PHOTO | Steak salad with tangy carrot-ginger dressing.

When I was a kid, my family had a tradition of going to Benihana (yes, the Japanese steakhouse chain restaurant) right around New Year’s Eve. And I always loved the carrot-ginger dressing they put on their salads. In fact, I’d ask the waiter for an extra amount on the side, which ended up over all my food (to the delight of the knife-flipping chef). So when I became a chef, I started to wonder about making the dressing myself.  (more…)

02/17/17 4:30pm
DAVID LAPHAM PHOTO | Nothing warms the winter soul like a bowl of bouillabaise, served with a toasted baguette topped by a little aioli.

DAVID LAPHAM PHOTO | Nothing warms the winter soul like a bowl of bouillabaise, served with a toasted baguette topped by a little aioli.

An easy and elegant dish to serve in the dead of winter, bouillabaisse (fish stew) has its roots in the southern French city of Marseilles.

Historically, fishermen would sell the best parts of their catch at the market and then save whatever was left over for their own families — and from that came bouillabaisse.  (more…)