Around the Island

What's Happening on Shelter Island: Week of February 9, 2012

WINTER WILDLIFE

Participate in a truck tour of Mashomack Preserve on Saturday, February 18 at 1 p.m. to search for seals and winter birds. Tom Damiani, coordinator of Mashomack’s Visitor Center, will lead the group, looking for seals on the rocks at low tide and birds seen only in winter, visiting the open water of Gardiner’s Bay. Bring binoculars. Hot chocolate will be provided. Pre-register by calling 749-1001. The program is free for members of the Nature Conservancy, $5 for non-members.

YOUTH CENTER EVENTS

In addition to its regular weekly programs, the Youth Center is planning an off-Island trip — to Plainview for rock climbing —  on Wednesday, February 22, open to grades 6 through 8. Parents need to let Youth Center Director Ian Kanarvogel know if their kids are interested in participating ([email protected]).

Closer to home, a ping pong tournament will be held at the Youth Center on Friday, February 17  from 7 to 10 p.m. for grades 5 through 12.

HAPPENING AT THE LEGION

Members of Mitchell Post 281 will hold an installation ceremony and dinner for American Legion officers on Sunday, February 12 at 2 p.m. at Legion Hall. Auxiliary members are also invited. A regular meeting of Legion members will take place on Monday, February 13 at 7 p.m.

IN THE DISPLAY CASE

There is a new exhibit in the Shelter Island Library’s display case on the main floor. Kirsten Lewis has loaned the library her 25-year-old collection of clay figurines made by the Waura Tribe in the Amazon area of Brazil. The figurines will be on display for the entire month of February.

ACROSS THE MOAT

MAKING VALENTINES

Kids ages 6 to 9 are invited to attend a Valentine’s Day Card Workshop at East Hampton’s Guild Hall on Saturday, February 11 from 10 to 11 a.m. The cost is $5 and $3 for members. To register, call 324-0806 or email [email protected] Guild Hall is located at 158 Main Street.

AT THE PICTURE SHOW…

Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theatre will continue its classic film series with a Ronald Coleman weekend. View “The Prisoner of Zenda” on Friday, February 10 and “Lost Horizon” on Saturday, February 11. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $5 at the door.

Earlier in the day on Saturday, there will be free cartoon flicks for kids from 3 to 7 p.m. Hot drinks will be available for adults at the bar.

‘HOW TO USE A CHART’

The Peconic Bay Power Squadron will present a boating seminar on Saturday, February 11 at 1 p.m. at West Marine on Old Country Road in Riverhead. Participants will learn about chart symbols, navigation aids, latitude and longitude and how to lay out a safe course. They will also receive a Maptech waterproof flip-fold, “Chart Symbols and On-the-Water Guide,” to take on board. The seminar course costs $45 including the cost of the manual. To reserve a space, call Captain Fred Roffe at 728-3721 or visit pbps.us.

ARTS-IN-COMMUNITY SERIES

East End Arts will continue its Third Thursdays series at Brecknock Hall in Greenport with a jazz program celebrating Black History Month on Thursday, February 16 at 6:30 p.m. Billy and Mark Johnson will accompany Brandon Boardman in a concert of compositions by African-American jazz legends — Duke Ellington, Thelonious Monk and Herbie Hancock among others. The concert is free and open to everyone.

PUPPET THEATRE

The Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre will perform “King Midas” — about a greedy king who learns about love — on Saturday, February 11 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the lower level of the Parish House of Christ Episcopal Church on Hampton Street in Sag Harbor. Tickets are $10, $9 for members and grandparents and $5 for children under 3. For more information, call 725-4193.

AN ‘URBAN NATIONAL PARK’

The North Fork Audubon Society will host an evening with Don Riepe, a former naturalist and manager of the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, on Friday, February 10 at 7 p.m. at the Red House, Inlet Pond County Park on Route 48 in Greenport. The refuge, is home to over 330 species of birds, 100 species of finfish, native reptiles and small mammals, more than 60 species of butterflies and one of the largest populations of horseshoe crabs in the northeast. The program is free.