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This week in Shelter Island history

JULIE LANE PHOTO The Chequit, which James and Linda Eklund sold for $3.35 million along with an unidentified amount of an extra payment for the good will of the business this fall, was purchased for $100,000 by a finance company in a foreclosure sale in 1994 to be resold to the couple that ran it for the past 20 years.

JULIE LANE PHOTO
The Chequit, which James and Linda Eklund sold for $3.35 million along with an unidentified amount of an extra payment for the good will of the business this fall, was purchased for $100,000 by a finance company in a foreclosure sale in 1994 to be resold to the couple that ran it for the past 20 years.

50 YEARS AGO IN HISTORY

Willie Nelson debuted at the Grand Ole’ Opry.The National Security Council recommended to President Lyndon Baines Johnson that he adopt a two-stage plan for escalating the bombing of North Vietnam.

Mariner 4 was launched on a 228-day mission to probe Mars. It was the first of the Mariner space flights that was to land on the red planet instead of just doing a fly-by.

The Shangri-Las’ “Leader of the Pack” topped the music charts in the United States.

In the United Kingdom, it was the Supremes’ “Baby Love” at the top of that country’s top 40 hits.

And on Shelter Island …

50 YEARS AGO
Court decision to speed improvements

While this item actually occurred in May 1932, it was carried in the Reporter of November 28, 1964, thanks to a reader who asked the paper to repeat it. The Appellate Division of the Supreme Court back in 1932 ruled that a previous Suffolk County bond issue that included a bridge between Shelter Island and the North Fork had to be allowed despite protests from Islanders. With the issuance of that opinion, the county concluded that it could push forward with the work.

POSTSCRIPT: There’s no indication of why the work didn’t happen back then, but it’s likely that today’s Shelter Island residents might seek to hang anyone who suggested its North or South ferries should be replaced by bridges.

30 YEARS AGO
Preserve to open special deer season

Mashomack Preserve director Mike Laspia 30 years ago announced that the area would be reopened to hunters during the following winter’s deer season in a special state-set hunting period from January 7 through 11 and January 14 through 18. Hunters was to be limited during that period to shotguns and muzzle loaders. Those interested in hunting in the preserve would have to pre-register and pay a $10 fee. The hunters would be limited to taking between 35 to 40 deer.

POSTSCRIPT: Fast forward to today and the Deer & Tick Committee anticipates receiving a plan next week aimed at increasing the number of deer hunters could take in the year ahead, likely by finding a way to increase incentives without violating the state Department of Environmental Conservation ban on directly paying for deer kills.

20 YEARS AGO
Chequit purchase confusing

Twenty years ago this month, there was initial confusion during a foreclosure sale when The Chequit Inn Ltd. bought its own property in a foreclosure sale outside Town Hall. The registered bidder, Lawrence Butler, won the day with a $100,000 bid on behalf of Borim Funding Corporation, the financing group that brought the foreclosure action. The original advertisement for the foreclosure sale called for an opening bid of $843,088 to satisfy a lien on the property, but the sole $100,000 bid was accepted.

Mr. Butler said Borim would be selling the Chequit to Linda and James Eklund and Mr. Eklund joked at the time that the cost for the purchase would be $101,000. Others at the time said they were confused by the bid and would have bid up to $900,000 for the property, but thought the $100,000 was added to the lien, but that wasn’t the case.

POSTSCRIPT: The Eklunds sold the Chequit this fall for $3.35 million to buyers who have yet to be identified. The Reporter learned that a side deal not reflected in real estate records also provided additional funding that allows the new owners to continue to use the name, the Internet domain name, telephone number and general good will of the business operation.

10 YEARS AGO
Upgrading security

It was at this time in 2004 that Shelter Island Board of Education members were debating methods of improving security at the school after two people were buzzed into the school, but disappeared in the building with no accounting of where they went. No problem developed but it raised concerns about how to monitor people entering the building during school hours with various suggestions being laid on the table for further discussion.

POSTSCRIPT: One of the suggestions debated 10 years ago is in effect today with building doors locked and entrance permitted only through the main lobby where a visitor encounters a staffer who provides a name tag and confirms that the person is expected by a staffer.

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