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Killer Bees sting Indians

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO | Tristan Wissemann seen here during an earlier game this season, scored 24 points against Bridgehampton Wednesday night.

BEVERLEA WALZ PHOTO | Tristan Wissemann seen here during an earlier game this season, scored 24 points against Bridgehampton Wednesday night.

Just how good is the Bridgehampton High School boys varsity basketball team at home on their very unique basketball court?

Very good.

The Killer Bees earned their name by playing a tough full court press against the Shelter Island boys varsity basketball team Wednesday night. On its very small court, Bridgehampton caused 18 first half turnovers and jumped out to a 25-7 first quarter advantage.

It probably didn’t help that the Indians were without one of their key starters, sophomore Semaj Lawrence, who was home sick with a stomach virus.

The Island boys were just coming off an impressive three-game winning streak prior to its facing the League VIII Champions who remain undefeated with a 13-0 record.

In the end, the Killer Bees posted a 77-57 victory, with the Indians scoring 30 points in the fourth quarter.

The final score was not necessarily indicative of the lopsided game, one that saw the Indians down by 41 points by the end of the third quarter.

Bridgehampton was led by their two outstanding players, juniors Charles Manning and Josh Lamison.

They combined for 49 points in just three quarters of play.

Most of their scoring came off turnovers and fast break lay-ups. This is a team that is quick and well coached. Interestingly enough, the Killer Bees struggled in their first meeting with the hometown Indians, managing a 14-point victory, but every quarter was highly contested.

The Indians were led by juniors Billy Boeklen (28) and Tristan Wissemann (24) who combined for 52 of the team’s 57 points. Actually, the Indians shot well from both the free throw line (75 percent) and from behind the arc (43 percent). Unfortunately, the Killer Bees who dominated the paint at both ends of the court, held the Indians to just 31 percent from two-point range.

But it was turnovers and rebounding that proved to be the difference in this game.

Coach Jay Card Jr. praised the effort of his players, playing hard to the very end. He said both he and the team will learn from this game.

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