Richard’s Almanac: Have family, will travel

COURTESY PHOTO | During their visit to Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida last spring, Poppy Johnson, her grandchildren, son and daughter-in-law came across a familiar name in an unexpected place.

COURTESY PHOTO | During their visit to Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida last spring, Poppy Johnson, her grandchildren, son and daughter-in-law came across a familiar name in an unexpected place.

I thought I’d let my readers know that I sent the receipt (proving that I took the “safe driving class” I described last week) to my insurance company, and I received a check representing 10 percent of my premium for liability and collision coverage.

Pretty fast work. I am delighted. So sign up for the next class set for December 5. Just call Laurie at (631) 749-1059 to register.

Meanwhile, I thought I’d pass on some information I gathered from a piece in Newsday last Sunday called “When Generations Travel Together.” It’s by Treva Lind and originally appeared in The Spokesman-Review in Spokane, Washington.

The article examines the benefits that can come from family members vacationing together, particularly when they do not see each other frequently. It gives the younger generation an opportunity to learn from the older and vice-versa. These vacations can be centered on a milestone event like a 75th birthday or an anniversary.

I know someone who rents a very large house in Vermont, Massachusetts or Connecticut for a week each year surrounding Thanksgiving and entertains children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews and siblings for a holiday time of togetherness.

A cruise is also a good venue for bringing family together. There’s always something for everyone on a ship.

Disneyland and Disney World are also popular places to get different generations together, according to this story.

Many grandparents like to organize these events and also foot the bills. They are more apt to have disposable income.

The older folk also want to do things before they too old and frail to travel.

The article points to Linda Crump, 76, who has rafted with one grandson and taken another to Hawaii.

“It’s important to do things with my grandchildren and the rest of my family; how much longer do I have?” Crump said.

And traveling with family has numerous benefits, according to Betty Quayle, 78, a Spokane resident who has gone with relatives on a Mexico cruise, to Sweden, Denmark and Norway.

“Going with family means you’re with somebody you can depend on, and they can depend on you,” she said, adding, “And it’s just more fun.”

As I read this article, I thought at first that it’s a great idea. But I think for anything that involves people, related or not, being together for a week or two, requires very careful planning.

I could see myself doing something like this with my own children and grandchildren but extending to other family members might be difficult. I would not know them as well.

And as far as meals go, I would only be comfortable with meals prepared by the hotel or cruise ship.

Also it should be made clear from the beginning that the older folks are not the built in baby-sitters.

Lots to think about and examine but it has the possibility of being a rewarding and memorable event.

Comments

comments