03/07/19 8:00am

COURTESY ILLUSTRATION A 1950 pictorial map of Shelter Island illustrated by The Nelson Studio, St. James, N.Y.

The shape of Shelter Island is changing. The impacts will be felt on our roads, utility infrastructure, drinking water and building lots -— especially near the shore. We should know what to expect and plan accordingly. Mashomack Preserve Director Jeremy Samuelson will address the role that The Nature Conservancy plays in bringing together community members, elected officials and planning professionals. He will talk about what we can expect in the years and decades to come at the Shelter Island Library’s Friday Night Dialogue on Friday, March 8.

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01/05/18 8:00am
ANNETTE HINKLE PHOTO | Jeremy Samuelson, director of Mashomack Preserve.

ANNETTE HINKLE PHOTO | Jeremy Samuelson, director of Mashomack Preserve.

The shape of Shelter Island is changing. The impacts will be felt on our roads, utility infrastructure, drinking water and building lots — especially near the shore. We should know what to expect and plan accordingly. (more…)

Featured Story
02/03/16 4:30pm
REPORTER FILE PHOTO REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Supervisor Jim Dougherty embraces the Long Island Nitrogen action plan, but thinks more study is a delaying tactic when the water quality problem is already critical.

REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Supervisor Jim Dougherty embraces the Long Island Nitrogen action plan, but thinks more study is a delaying tactic when the water quality problem is already critical.

There’s a disconnect between Shelter Island officials and some Suffolk County groups seeking to address issues related to water quality and transportation. (more…)

Featured Story
04/29/14 8:00am
COURTESY PHOTO | Face-to-face with a mute swan. A reader writes to protest proposed culls of the big birds.

COURTESY PHOTO |
Face-to-face with a mute swan. A reader writes to protest proposed culls of the big birds.

To the Editor:
In response to the article discussing the DEC’s possible decision to eradicate the mute swan (“Sides meet in Albany to talk swans,” April 24), I find it hard to believe this organization is even considering this possible option.

Any of us who have spent any time outside knows that you have to give these majestic birds their “elbow room” and never approach them, especially during their nesting time. The fact that they are tough and not to be messed with only endears them to me more.

Maybe the public should consider eradicating the DEC itself if this is the best decision that this entity can come up with. After all, we taxpayers are funding them to the tune of $1 billion a year with 3,000 employees. Maybe they have become too big as they imply the population of the mute swans have become. I find it amazing that this topic is even up for discussion.

PAUL COLEMAN
Mattituck