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Shelter Island Justice Court

REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Shelter Island Justice Court

REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Shelter Island Justice Court

The following cases were adjudicated at Shelter Island Justice Court on January 23, 2017, as reported by the court. Judge Mary-Faith Westervelt was on the bench.

Daniel Conaty of Mattituck pleaded guilty to a charge of driving while ability impaired, reduced from driving while intoxicated and was fined $300 plus a $260 state surcharge. He received a 90-day license suspension and was given a one-year conditional discharge.

Nicholas S. Ryan of Shelter Island was fined $350 plus $260 for driving while ability impaired. His license was suspended for 90 days. Turn signal and lane violations were covered in the plea.

Rafael Trejo of Farmingville pleaded guilty to a charge of facilitating aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree, reduced from aggravated unlicensed aggravation in the second degree. He was fined $200 plus $93. A seat belt violation was covered in the plea.

Pablo M. Loja Barrera of Port Washington, charged with unlicensed driving, was fined $100 plus $93. A second charge of speeding — 37 miles per hour in a 25-mph zone — was reduced to 30 miles per hour and he was fined $75 plus $93.

Leonel A. Hernandez Galindo of Greenport was fined $100 plus $93 for driving while using a cellphone without a hands-free device. He was also fined $100 plus $93 for driving without a license.

Shane T. Hughes of Shelter Island was fined $100 plus $93 for unlicensed operation, reduced from aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree. He was also fined $50 plus $93 for a turn signal violation, reduced from a cellphone violation. A charge of driving without a license was covered in the plea.

Bruce J. Taplin of Shelter Island pleaded guilty to possession of marijuana in the fourth degree. He was given a one-year interim probation, and his case adjourned for sentencing in January 2018.

Jorge Ramirez-Perez of Albuquerque, New Mexico was cited as a scofflaw for failure to appear in court on a cellphone violation.

Twelve cases were adjourned until later dates on the court’s calendar — three at the court’s request and nine at the request of the defendants or their attorneys.

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