01/05/18 8:00am
ANNETTE HINKLE PHOTO | Jeremy Samuelson, director of Mashomack Preserve.

ANNETTE HINKLE PHOTO | Jeremy Samuelson, director of Mashomack Preserve.

The shape of Shelter Island is changing. The impacts will be felt on our roads, utility infrastructure, drinking water and building lots — especially near the shore. We should know what to expect and plan accordingly. (more…)

Featured Story
02/03/16 4:30pm
REPORTER FILE PHOTO REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Supervisor Jim Dougherty embraces the Long Island Nitrogen action plan, but thinks more study is a delaying tactic when the water quality problem is already critical.

REPORTER FILE PHOTO | Supervisor Jim Dougherty embraces the Long Island Nitrogen action plan, but thinks more study is a delaying tactic when the water quality problem is already critical.

There’s a disconnect between Shelter Island officials and some Suffolk County groups seeking to address issues related to water quality and transportation. (more…)

Featured Story
04/29/14 8:00am
COURTESY PHOTO | Face-to-face with a mute swan. A reader writes to protest proposed culls of the big birds.

COURTESY PHOTO |
Face-to-face with a mute swan. A reader writes to protest proposed culls of the big birds.

To the Editor:
In response to the article discussing the DEC’s possible decision to eradicate the mute swan (“Sides meet in Albany to talk swans,” April 24), I find it hard to believe this organization is even considering this possible option.

Any of us who have spent any time outside knows that you have to give these majestic birds their “elbow room” and never approach them, especially during their nesting time. The fact that they are tough and not to be messed with only endears them to me more.

Maybe the public should consider eradicating the DEC itself if this is the best decision that this entity can come up with. After all, we taxpayers are funding them to the tune of $1 billion a year with 3,000 employees. Maybe they have become too big as they imply the population of the mute swans have become. I find it amazing that this topic is even up for discussion.

PAUL COLEMAN
Mattituck

11/09/12 6:00am

TIM GANNON FILE PHOTO | A view across the bays from Strong’s Marine in Flanders as the hurricane was moving on shore last Monday.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation announced Thursday some shellfishing areas around Long Island have been reopened.

The DEC had initially closed shellfishing area on Oct. 29, the morning Hurricane Sandy first touched our shores, through Nov. 13.

The following areas in Southold Town have been reopened: All the normally certified shellfish lands in Flanders Bay, Great Peconic Bay, Little Peconic Bay, Cutchogue Harbor and Hog Neck Bay lying westerly of the Cedar Beach Point. In addition, all the normally certified areas along the northern shore of Fishers Island, including Hay Harbor, West Harbor and East Harbor, have been reopened.

Over in Southampton Town,  all the normally certified shellfish lands in Moriches Bay, Narrow Bay, Flanders Bay, Great Peconic Bay and Little Peconic Bay lying westerly of the northern most point of Jessups Neck,

All the normally certified shellfish lands in Flanders Bay located in Riverhead Town has also been reopened to shellfishing.

DEC officials said all enclosed creeks, harbors, coves and tributaries in Riverhead Town, as well as along the south shore of Southold Town and the north shore of Southampton Town remain closed for the harvest of shellfish and bay scallops through Nov. 13.

DEC officials said it will continue to conduct shoreline assessments and collect water samples for bacteriological testing.  Other shellfishing areas will reopen based on those test results.

A recorded message advising harvesters of the status of these shellfish areas is available by calling (631) 444-0480. To speak with someone about shellfishing closures, call (631) 444-0475 during normal business hours.  Additional information about temporary closures is available on DEC’s website at: www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7765.html.